Stretching, spicing and snapchatting: tips for SMES in the health and fitness industry

Running a successful health and fitness business is more than just keeping people healthy. It’s a sunny mix of reputation building, communicating and keeping on top of trends. After 2016 – the year of clickbait and fake news – people are looking for the real, human faces behind the brands, with fitness being no exception. 2017 is the year of tailored fitness plans, honest communication and looking beyond quinoa.

Here are our tips for small businesses in the health and fitness space…

Keep riding the January wave

You heard it here first: February is the new January. While gyms across New Zealand welcome legions of carb-crippled fairweather exercisers in January, it’s the ones that stick around for February that are your real target audience. These are the people that have started to see a positive change from their health and fitness regime and want to spice it up a little.

Find them with active social media marketing: browse gym check-ins in your area and tagged progress pics. People tend to be active at the start of a new health and fitness routine, so use this to pitch for their custom.

Be real about your results

Digitally savvy people see right through clickbaity content. Don’t exaggerate the results of your product or service to get traffic – it’ll damage your credibility and end in mismatched expectations (I’m pretty sure I am not going to lose 5 kgs of fat in a week!).

A big part of building a positive reputation is having a human face. A testimonial from a real client is worth ten thousand reposts. If you’re just starting out, ask a keen friend to test out your program. Take photos and Snapchat the process, then get them to write a testimonial for you to share on social media.

Stretch the boat out

Warming up is the new working out. Formerly the preserve of only the most angelic of athletes, stretching is blossoming from an afterthought into a workout in itself, spreading like wildfire through fitness communities around the world. Accessible, not daunting and feel good, get ahead of the trend by incorporating stretching into your program. If you’re unsure, set up a quick signup page on your website to gauge interest.

Fitness for busy people

A recent study suggested that working more than 39 hours per week can have a negative impact on your health. With working hours showing no signs of slowing, the market is wide open for wellbeing initiatives that can combat the effects of long hours.

Although Kiwis have less time to prepare healthy meals and exercise, they’re as fitness conscious as ever. Tailor your recommendations to busy people: share on social an easy 10-minute workout or a set of stretches you can do at your desk. If you’re a foodie, share some easy, healthy recipes you can whip up in the work kitchen. Some companies fund wellbeing programs for their employees – look into partnering with them.

So there you have it – our sizzling top tips of 2017. Stay real, get spicy, stretch it out and help out the busy people. On your marks, get set…go!

Spotcap can provide online business loans to SMEs in the health and fitness industry, to help them capitalise on the post-January fitness wave. Get in touch with us on 0800 444 540 or by email at support@spotcap.co.nz to find out more.

Business growth awaits

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